Theodotos Anticipates Bultmann

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Secret Alias
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Theodotos Anticipates Bultmann

Post by Secret Alias » Mon Mar 16, 2020 9:38 am

That he was other than what he received is clear from what he professes, “I am the Life, I am the Truth, I and the Father are one.” But the spiritual nature, which he received, and the psychic he thus indicates, “And the child grew and advanced greatly.” For the spiritual nature needs wisdom but the psychic needs size. But by the flowing out from his side he indicates that the substances having become free from passion have been saved by the flowings out of the passions from those who shared in them. And when he says “The Son of Man must be rejected and insulted and crucified,” he seems to be speaking of someone else, that is, of him who has passion. And he says, “On the third of the days I will go before you into Galilee.” For he goes before all and indicated that he will raise up the soul which is being invisibly saved and will restore it to the place where he is now leading the way. And he died at the departure of the Spirit which had descended upon him in the Jordan, not that it became separate but was withdrawn in order that death might also operate on him, since how did the body die when life was present in him? For in that way death would have prevailed over the Saviour himself, which is absurd. But death was out-generalled by guile. For when the body died and death seized it, the Saviour sent forth the ray of power which had come upon him and destroyed death and raised up the mortal body which had put off passion. In this way, therefore, the psychic elements are raised and are saved, but the spiritual natures which believe receive a salvation superior to theirs, having received their souls as “wedding garments.” [61]
“Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind.”
― Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quixote

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